The Ministry of Bombastic Bloggers

Hello people! Today seems to be a wonderful day! Can you guess why? We are finally out with the final part of our collab! DRUMBEATS!!!

You may recall our reviews of the book “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness” (Linked Here;lifeofchaz and Here;inkandthoughts), but do you know what really happens behind the scenes? Well if you don’t, here are a few things you should know about how the magic of “collabing” works.

Things That Go Into A Collab

  • Trying to get Chaz to read the book for two and a half months.
  • Trying to explain to Chaz concepts one-hundred times because he never understands the first time.
  • Trying to work with ten hour time difference living on opposite sides of the world.
  • Waking up at 3AM to finish writing posts and making Instagram posts. Take a guess, as to who did that…
  • Attempting to book plane tickets to India in two days, and then cancelling because a certain “someone” threatened the other about their collab answers.
  • Hiding out in a car to escape mothers to talk to bloggers in the U.S after staying up all night.
  • Losing hope that the post will ever be done.
  • Being astonished when “someone” finally finishes the book and writes up a post.
  • Learning what Instagram is and what “Boomerang’s” are.
  • Surviving after talking to each other for weeks on end.

A small sneak peek for the readers, who thought it would be easy to work on a collab. Trust me, it is not, especially when two dumb heads come together to talk about intellectual things. In between taking jabs at each other, every now and then and cracking lame jokes, we tried to perfect our art of coming up with philosophical answers. This final draft pays testimony to our numerous attempts of answering these questions and polishing them till they were the best (at least for us)! So please don’t judge us too harshly!

Chaz’s Clever Questions to Bhagyashree

1) Media can portray only the negative aspects of certain events and culture to skew people’s perceptions which end up making them blow certain things out of proportion. Do you feel this novel portrayed anything unfairly?

That is the beauty of this novel, it never presents anything with a backdrop of fairness or

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Read and reviewed the ENTIRE stack waiting for Chaz to read one book.

impartiality. It presents the facts as they are, leaving it on the shoulders of the capable readers(like both of us, an oxymoron in itself, isn’t it ) to form their own opinions. I won’t say that the novel has portrayed anything in negative light, but yes, it would have been a good idea had the author included other perspectives than just the characters themselves. And a more, well-mapped plot, that does not include everything that the characters (or the author herself) come across, would have mellowed down the story for people like us. Although, when we talk of Roy, as a precocious author, we can’t really expect that to happen, so I guess what we are left is, broaden our understanding!

2) How important is a well structured plot for you? Did you feel the same way I did, or do you think that the message of the story is much more important than making sure the story beats are in the right spot?

I believe both a well-structured plot and powerful message go hand in hand, in the

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Let’s read it a few more times, until we actually start working on the collab.

making of a great story. One without the other fails to create the charismatic impact that the author wishes to cast on his/her readers. On one hand the plot steers our imagination on a well routed path, the message of the story, on the other hand, lets us run our imagination wild, on uncharted lands in search of interpretations. I disagree with the notion that the author should focus on either of the two things while carving a story, but surely, the plot shouldn’t have too many backstories and character arcs framing spontaneously, like we have in the book. That just leads to the reader losing momentum of the story.

3) We had spoken about if this book was required to read in schools in India. With so much discussion on censorship lately, do you feel works like these should be encouraged to read? How young would be too young to introduce these dark themes during class?

Roy’s works have always tackled the dark realms of truth in an unpretentious manner.

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Months flew by, waiting for Chaz to finish reading.

Once you decide to read her novels, you can expect yourself to be drawn in a labyrinth of reality, that you are aware of, but fail to acknowledge its presence. Censoring stories like these, would mean holding back the links which connect people with the reality behind the farce reality. So I believe works like these should defiantly be encouraged to read right from the time we learn to distinguish between right and wrong and form our own judgments and opinions. Coming to the last part of your question, you can’t expect a scenario where kindergartner kids are debating on these issues, can you? (But then, you would be dealing with the smartest set of kindergarten kids on this planet, a bit unrealistic no?) I understand your concern about the impact this novel revolving around relatively dark themes can have on young minds, so I ‘ll say, teenagers on the brink of adulthood and people beyond this age bracket with their well developed analytical and conclusive skills, would be the best audience for the book.

4) Pain is everywhere in this story. Do you share in any of the pains and struggles that some of the characters in the story faced? Which of the struggles are you fighting against the most in your own life?

Each character in the novel deals with different kinds of pain and battles his/her own victories. Acceptance of an identity, pain of losing loved ones, trying to be befitting in a world you don’t belong to and the courageous struggle to start anew are some of core threads discussed in the story. It wouldn’t be a misnomer to say, we are bound to face the pains and struggles of each character in some way or the other in our long, long lives. Given a choice, I would go for the pain and struggles of accepting and adapting to a change, faced by the country, rather than any specific character. Now that more makes sense, since about to start college. Lol!

5) There are a lot of themes involved in this novel that have to do with family relationships, especially motherhood. We saw Anjum ripped from her family, and family ripped from her, plus the same for the other characters. How important is it to listen to your family? Should they control who you really want to be? 

Family is an exceedingly important part of who we are, what we do, the choices we make and how we lead our lives. However, I don’t believe being a part of a family should entirely dictate the terms of our choices and the way of our living. There is a very fine line between looking up to your family for guidance and acting according to their predictions up to the point you suffocate your freedom. The entire burden of balance lies on this willowy line. I guess as long as this line doesn’t slant too much on either side, you’ll be fine. A hard task surely, but worth trying. If not anything, you would have some great things to laugh about, later on!

Bhagyashree’s Brainiac Questions to Chaz

1) Being a foreigner to the novel did you have any preconceptions / notions about the story? How did they change after completing the novel? What are your thoughts about the author after going through her works? Would you continue reading her works here after?

I had no idea what this story was going to be about. It’s funny because when I looked it

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Chaz working hard on his reading.

up, I saw the word “romance” somewhere in the synopsis and falsely assumed it was a love story. (I told that to Bhagyashree and she could not believe me!) My thoughts could not be more different than what they were starting the novel. Roy now reminds me of a strong political writer, and I think I would probably read another one of her works if she continues to publish. I am looking into reading her first novel now as well!

2) How did you interpet the title both at the beginning and at the end of the book? Do you think the story plays justics to the title or it talks about finding acceptance in pain?

I’m honestly still not sure what to think about it. (This is the hardest question out of all of

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Chaz’s pup doing all of the work for him.

them!) The characters ended up in their own little communities together, but its hard to imagine any type of happiness after all of the pain the story weaved through. I did not think this was going to be a happy story in the beginning though.

 

 

3) The book talks about how political turmoil affects people from all walks of life and their adverse reactions to situations concerning them thereafter. Do you think the author justifies them or piques the reader’s sympathy towards these people in any way? Or it is just an attempt of condemning these actions?

I think that the author does a great job in portraying these struggles in the way that she does not try to pique sympathy with over-the-top techniques. I had mentioned in my review about the “rawness” of the story, and in that sense the author just shows what is happening. It is up to you if you want to feel bad or not, but the story is not going to wait for you to make a decision.

4) The author challenges the very idea of attaining happiness by orthodox means through her characters. Do you believe an individual’s circumstances come into play here more than his/her own choices? How do you think the lives of these characters would have turned out had they succumbed to the guidelines entrenched with rules and boundaries?

I think that Roy is trying to abolish the old rules and boundaries that society has put up

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Chaz attempting to read.

ever since we can remember. We are in a big turning point as far as social movements go, and the author celebrates that with the choices that she has her characters make. The characters may have had an easier life if they had confined themselves to the old rules, but it is clear that they would not be truly happy if they never remained true to themselves.

5) The novel talks about development in the sense of losing grasp of one’s roots. Do you share the author’s acceptance that this is the way forward? Do you think reading and writing about struggles of the ‘silenced’ would help make the society more empathetic towards these people and eventually alternate avenues of development would emerge?

Yes – telling the stories of the silenced does go a long way in making people more empathetic. We have seen examples of it happening before with every social movement that has succeeded. If you look at the world’s history you can follow the lines of each movement and how they succeeded. These stories play an important part in the development of those movements.  I am in full support of it and in full support of losing grasps of ones roots. Just because the roots are there, it does not mean that they are worth losing. (In this case they are!)

6) There are a variety of social issues discussed in the novel ranging from social inequality, exclusion, domestic violence to depression and political turmoil among others. Which if these varied themes according to you needs to be extensively written and widely read in the current times?

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Chaz still attempting to read, but at a different camera angle.

Would it be a cop-out to say that all of them should still be explored? While there are progressive movements that are in different stages than the others, and some of them much further along, we have seen that it is important to keep writing about them even after the movement has come to a “success”. Everyone should be able to experience the freedoms that they are deserved, and the battle for them is unfortunately not close to being over, but at least we are living through the most progressive time in recent history.

 

Future Collabs

Thanks for taking the time to follow me on the journey of my first collab! I hope that it was not too boring and not too out of the ordinary for one of my boring book review blog posts. I had a ton of fun with the actual “collabing” part of the collaboration, even if it took me months to actually finish the book… If any of you guys are interested in teaming up with me, please shoot me a DM on instagram and we can make it happen! (But definitely pay attention to all of Bhagyashree’s warnings…)

 


 

LIFE OF CHAZ (1)

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25 thoughts on “The Ministry of Bombastic Bloggers

  1. I really loved this piece. It looks like you had fun collaborating! And tore some hairs too…both ways. 😀

    I don’t think I’ll ever be able to collab with anyone, too chicken to do it. And yeah, I suck at asking questions.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. What an amazing idea! I absolutely loved this! I haven’t done a collab like this before, but I’ve been doing buddy reads and it’s so much fun. It’s really helped me get to know other great bloggers so much more. I’m excited to see future collab posts!

    Also … YOUR DOG IS SO ADORABLE!!!

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Just loved this so much. The process and photos haves me a good laugh. Reminds me of the first and only author I interview I’ve done so far, with fellow blogger Akarsh Jain. Still am very grateful for his tolerance. 😂 Also love the title and this book review format is brilliant… was just comment-chatting the other day with another blogger about the idea of somehow making a WordPress book club. Anyway, thanks for the Thursday morning entertainment!

    Liked by 3 people

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